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What the hell’s going on at the ANC NEC – and why you should care

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What the hell’s going on at the ANC NEC – and why you should care

The party’s weekend NEC meeting appears to be a breakpoint: the two factions that have tenuously co-existed since Ramaphosa was elected party leader in December 2017 are now in open political warfare.

The meeting appears to have descended into a gigantic tit-for-tat session that did not dea

l with vaccines, the economy, joblessness, the stratospheric cost of electricity, or any

other public affairs that have an impact on South Africa’s people.

ANC Secretary-General Ace Magashule, who, with his co-accused,

has been charged with 74 counts of fraud and corruption over the R233-million asbestos

roof audit in the Free State, is deemed by the ANC constitution to have committed an act of misconduct,

senior party leaders resolved at the party’s nail-biting weekend National Executive Committee (NEC) meeting.

A motion was put forward that he should therefore step aside from his role in seven days

or face suspension and a disciplinary inquiry, and this caused what SA Times News described as a

“descent into chaos”. President Cyril Ramaphosa was forced to postpone a widel publicised closing address on Sunday, March 28, as the meeting goes into the fourth day.

Magashule’s supporters said he would refuse to step aside and reiterated their view that

only a national conference of branches could make him do so. For two weeks now,

Magashule has denied that any structure of the ANC has authority over him or the power

to make key decisions like whether or not Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane should face an inquiry over her fitness to hold office.

The party’s constitution is clear that the ANC NEC has the power to make decisions between conferences.

The party’s weekend NEC meeting appears to be a breakpoint: the two factions that have

tenuously co-existed since Ramaphosa was elected party leader in December 2017 are

now in open political warfare. Outside the ANC HQ, Luthuli House, at the weekend,

Magashule’s de facto private militia, a contingent of MK Military Veterans Association

members, marched in camouflage uniforms in protest against any action on the secretary-general.

These two factions can be classified as a reform wing and a Radical Economic

Transformation (RET) wing. Ramaphosa won with a wafer-thin majority in 2017, and his

support on the NEC is a small majority, meaning that most meetings are battle zones.

The weekend’s gathering appears to have been worse than usual, with City Press reporting that it was a bickering-fest as the two factions tried to score points against each other.

All of Ramaphosa’s allies who have also faced any corruption challenges were told that

they too should step aside if Magashule were forced to do so.

The meeting appears to have descended into a gigantic tit-for-tat session that did not deal

with vaccines, the economy, joblessness, the stratospheric cost of electricity, or any other

public affairs that have an impact on South Africa’s people.

What is likely to happen now?

Magashule runs his office with a coterie of his own lieutenants (rather than party officials),

and he is unlikely to accept a suspension. Party political drama will be the template for the

rest of 2021, while Rapport reported at the weekend that Luthuli House staff want to

strike because their packages and conditions of service have been reduced.

The party can convene a disciplinary committee that can draw up a charge sheet against

Magashule to include misconduct related to the criminal charges and bring charges of

insubordination against him should he not stand aside.

Rule 25.17.4 of the party’s constitution defines an act of misconduct as:

“Engaging in any unethical or immoral conduct which detracts from the character, values

and the integrity of the ANC NEC, as may be determined by the Integrity Commission, which

brings or could bring or has the potential to bring or as a consequence thereof brings the ANC into disrepute.”

The Integrity Commission completed its report into Magashule in December 2020 and said that the NEC should make him step aside.

The ANC’s palace politics bears almost no resemblance to the issues that South Africa’s

people care about, but they matter because the factional battles can destabilise

government; delay the Covid-19 vaccine roll-out, since the executive’s eye is on party

politics rather than the public health emergency; and because there is now a developing

view that a weakened Ramaphosa who cannot run his party will be a single-term president.

 

Ace Magashule, South Africa’s next president!